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    Loyola Marymount University
   
 
  Sep 25, 2017
 
 
    
Loyola Marymount University Bulletin 2017-2018

Physics, B.S.


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Objectives


The B.S. Physics degree provides a solid foundation in classical and modern physics. This program is well suited for the student who wishes to continue the study of physics at the graduate level, leading to a career in research and/or university teaching. With a proper choice of electives, the physics degree is also suitable for a variety of other careers requiring graduate education. Physics graduates can pursue advanced studies in fields such as optics, biophysics, geophysics and space science, nuclear engineering, business management, or law. Some physics majors choose electives that prepare them for medical school. Physics graduates can also select immediate employment in a number of areas, including high school teaching and various areas of industrial science and technology. Because of the flexibility of the physics major, with its numerous electives, it is possible to double major in physics and some other discipline. Examples of double degrees that can be completed in four years are physics and math, or physics and chemistry. Each of these double majors is very powerful, in that it develops the ability to solve problems that require a knowledge of two separate disciplines.

Major Requirements


Note:


Each course in MATH and PHYS listed above must be passed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

Three upper division physics electives selected from the following:


Seniors must complete:


Note:


To graduate, a student must have at least a 2.0 average in all upper division physics courses.

Learning Outcomes


Physics majors will know:

  1. The concepts of classical physics
  2. The theories of modern physics
  3. The discoveries and questions of contemporary physics

Physics majors will be able to:

  1. Form new inferences about the physical world by carrying out scientific investigations
  2. Solve problems, which includes formulating a strategy, estimating a solution, applying appropriate techniques, and evaluating the result
  3. Design and conduct experiments, and well as analyze and interpret the resulting data
  4. Employ computational methods to perform calculations and model physical systems
  5. Communicate effectively their understanding of core physical principles, the results of experiments, and their analysis of physical problems

Physics majors will value:

  1. Ethical and unbiased actions as cornerstones to the scientific method
  2. The impact of physics on society
  3. The role of elegance and beauty in the scientific process

Physics Curriculum


(125-129 S.H.)

Freshman Year


Fall Semester


Total: 14-15 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 14-15 semester hours

Sophomore Year


Fall Semester


Total: 14-15 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 16-18 semester hours

Junior Year


Fall Semester


Total: 15-17 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 15-17 semester hours

Senior Year


Fall Semester


Total: 16-18 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 16-19 semester hours

Total: 125-129 semester hours


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