Aug 04, 2020  
Loyola Marymount University Bulletin 2014-2015 
    
Loyola Marymount University Bulletin 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Philosophy, B.A.


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Objectives


Philosophy is a reflective and critical discipline whose aim is to explore fundamental ideas which underlie and penetrate human existence and constitute the deep background of all human endeavors: ideas such as Meaning and Truth, Knowledge and Being, Objectivity and Bias, Good and Evil, Value and Disvalue. Philosophic inquiry into these and related notions is governed by the complementary ideals of analytic precision and comprehensive synthesis, and so it aims to raise these basic notions from their everyday obscurity, to articulate them with logical precision and rigor, and to bind them together into an overarching vision of the nature and purpose of human life.

Accordingly, the Department of Philosophy offers basic courses in Critical Thinking, Human Nature, Ethics, and Contemporary Moral Problems in the core curriculum and a wide variety of courses complementary to studies in a broad range of fields. For convenience, courses are grouped into eight content areas:

  1. Morality, Law, and Politics (PHIL 320  through PHIL 334 ) (see Course Descriptions )
  2. Natural and Social Sciences (PHIL 341 , PHIL 343 )
  3. Arts and Literature (PHIL 254 , PHIL 351 , PHIL 352 , PHIL 353 , PHIL 354 )
  4. Religion and Theology (PHIL 361  through PHIL 368 ) (see Course Descriptions )
  5. History of Philosophy (PHIL 381 , PHIL 382 , PHIL 383 , PHIL 385 , PHIL 387 )
  6. Contemporary Movements (PHIL 421  through PHIL 426 ) (see Course Descriptions )
  7. Major Thinkers (PHIL 451 )
  8. Mind and Reality (PHIL 461  through PHIL 464 ) (see Course Descriptions )

Philosophy Student Learning Outcomes


Philosophy students will understand:

  • The history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics to modern European thinkers
  • Contemporary philosophical movements, issues, and techniques
  • Central themes in the primary texts of important philosophers

Philosophy students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate written competency in the analysis of philosophical issues
  • Apply the tools of logic in the analysis and critical evaluation of philosophical texts
  • Synthesize philosophical insights in relation to their own lived experience

Philosophy students will value:

  • The contributions of philosophers to civilization
  • An understanding of the relationship of philosophy to a variety of areas of human experience such as faith, morality, and culture
  • Rigorous philosophical inquiry and reflection in relation to their own self-development, their interactions with others, and the quest for a better world.

Major Requirements


At entry to the University, students may declare the major or minor through the Office of Admission. LMU students wishing thereafter to declare the major or minor must meet with the chair. The chair will ordinarily sign the student’s Change of Program petition, provided the student meets certain academic standards that include having a minimum GPA of 2.0 (C), not otherwise being on academic probation, and (for majors) upon completion of an entrance questionnaire.

Symbolic Logic


The History of Philosophy sequence


Note:


Students are encouraged to take the History of Philosophy sequence in chronological order.

Five Philosophy electives


At least three of these electives must be upper division courses taken at LMU, in addition to the courses that satisfy the University Core Philosophical Inquiry and Ethics and Justice requirements.

Senior Assessment


Note:


Students are strongly encouraged to study a foreign language to enhance their philosophical studies. Programs should be planned in consultation with their faculty advisor.

An average grade of C+ (2.3) must be maintained in Philosophy courses by majors.

Majors may take up to 13 upper division courses in Philosophy.

Honors in Philosophy


To graduate with honors in Philosophy, a Philosophy major must have a minimum GPA in Philosophy of 3.3, enroll in the PHIL 500 Senior Project  in place of one of the upper division electives, and receive at least a grade of B+ (3.3) on the project.

Philosophy Model Four-Year Plan


The normal course load is 15 semester hours (5 classes). By following the model below, a student will complete all lower division core requirements by the end of the sophomore year as well as PHIL major prerequisites. Note that core areas are suggested to provide a distribution of various disciplines every semester. Please be flexible implementing these suggestions, given your own interests and course availability. In four years, this plan meets all common graduation requirements.

Freshman Year


Fall Semester


Total: 15 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 15 semester hours

Sophomore Year


Fall Semester


  • PHIL 221 Symbolic Logic 3 semester hours
  • University Core 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
Total: 15 semester hours

Spring Semester


  • University Core 3 semester hours
  • University Core 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
Total: 15 semester hours

Junior Year


Fall Semester


Total: 15 semester hours

Spring Semester


  • PHIL 383 Medieval Philosophy 3 semester hours
  • Upper Division PHIL 3 semester hours
  • Upper Division PHIL 3 semester hours
  • University Core 3 semester hours
  • Upper Division Elective 3 semester hours
Total: 15 semester hours

Senior Year


Fall Semester


  • PHIL 385 Modern Philosophy I 3 semester hours
  • Upper Division PHIL 3 semester hours
  • University Core 3 semester hours
  • Upper Division Elective 3 semester hours
  • Elective 3 semester hours
Total: 15 semester hours

Spring Semester


Total: 15 semester hours

Note:


Students may take a maximum of thirteen upper division courses in Philosophy.

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