Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

ENTR 1310  Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship  (4 semester hours)  
The course introduces students to the basic concepts in entrepreneurship and the role entrepreneurship plays in society. It engages students in various experiential learning exercises to spark their interest in the subject and expand their entrepreneurial competencies, e.g., creativity, initiative, etc. A key assignment in the course challenges students to identify problems and conduct research in one or more industries and devise one (or more) feasible solution(s). Finally, the course introduces students to the different pathways in the major and potential career options early in their educational process.
ENTR 1398  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
ENTR 2310  Technology Trends, Opportunities, and Tools  (4 semester hours)  
The course provides students with a basic understanding and appreciation of the history and processes of scientific discoveries and technological developments--and their remarkable effects on new business opportunities. It introduces students to some of the most current technological developments, trends, and issues (e.g., possibilities and limitations) in such relevant fields as artificial intelligence, internet of things, clean-tech, and biotechnology. The course also explores such relevant business concepts such as disruptive technologies, first-mover advantage, economics of increasing returns, technology/product lifecycle, piracy, and technology stands, among others. The course intends to prepare students to appreciate and identify the immense business opportunities that arise from new scientific discoveries and technological developments. Lastly, the course introduces students to several technology tools (e.g., Photoshop, SolidWorks [simplified version], 3D-printing, Slack, etc.) that will aid them in their subsequent courses. Prerequisite: ENTR 1310.
ENTR 2398  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
ENTR 3310  Introduction to Entrepreneurship  (3 semester hours)  
This course is designed to introduce students to entrepreneurship as an integral part of our economy at the local, regional, national, and global level. Students will learn about the processes involved in taking entrepreneurial ideas from conception to new venture launch, with emphasis placed on the creativity, critical thinking skills, and flexibility essential to recognizing business opportunities and assessing those opportunities' feasibility in uncertain, dynamic markets. At a more detailed level, students will be exposed (through readings and experiential exercises) to issues of creativity and innovation, feasibility analysis, "proof of concept" development, and new venture leadership. Junior standing required. Prerequisites: BADM 1010, BADM 1020, all with a minimum grade of C (2.0).
ENTR 3320  Real Estate Finance, Investment, and Entrepreneurship  (4 semester hours)  
This course introduces students to gathering relevant data (both primary and secondary data) to build financial models for analyzing, interpreting, and making decisions on evaluation of alternative real estate investment opportunities with alternative financial structures. Hands-on entrepreneurial learning makes use of cases, gathering primary data, financial modeling, and estimating the most an investor should pay for a specific property. More specifically, this course includes determining a property's "investment value," financing strategy, risk analysis, taxation, market area supply and demand analysis by property type (e.g, single-family homes, apartments, office, retail, warehouses, and other industrial properties), alternative investment ownership (e.g., sole proprietorships, REITs, Limited Partnerships, LLCs, etc.), as well as evaluating alternative financing instruments in both primary and secondary markets. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310; BCOR 3410 or FNCE 3400.
ENTR 3325  Real Estate Development  (4 semester hours)  
This course is designed to introduce students to the intricacies of real estate development with the focus on multifamily and mixed-use properties. As the developer, there are multiple facets of the process that require skill and determination. Subjects covered are land acquisition and locational attributes; zoning and entitlements; project design and feasibility; construction costs; financial analysis; obtaining financing and partners; managing construction and the general contractor; lease-up, operations and property management; and finally, sale and/or resolution and repayment to lenders and partners. The course will introduce all these elements and teach students through real development transactions being built in the marketplace. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and BCOR 3410 or FNCE 3400.
ENTR 3340  International Entrepreneurship  (4 semester hours)  
This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills in three key components of international entrepreneurship: initiating entrepreneurial ventures, managing international business transactions, and dealing with multicultural business environments. The course includes a feasibility study of an international small business venture start up, case study, and experiential learning. (See INBA 4840 and MGMT 4660.) Prerequisites: BCOR 3860, ENTR 1310
ENTR 3350  New Venture Creation  (4 semester hours)  
This course has been designed to provide students with an overall understanding of the concept of entrepreneurship and small business management, and to prepare them for starting, surviving, and succeeding in business. A major thrust of this course is developing a solid business concept, which involves identifying problems, finding one or more solutions, building a series of Minimal Viable Products (MVPs) and testing/validating the concept (market validation), modifying the business model (pivoting), and formulating a professionally constructed workable plan (business pitch deck/plan). Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310.
ENTR 3356  Entrepreneurial Finance  (2 semester hours)  
The Entrepreneurial Finance course equips students the key relevant skills necessary for financial planning and projections for a startup or a new project. In addition, the course introduces students to the various concepts, resources, and strategies for financing a new and growing venture. Finally, students evaluate the key tactics and approaches to negotiation when attempting to structure a deal for a new venture and explore the different exit alternatives and strategies. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310.
ENTR 3357  Entrepreneurial Marketing  (2 semester hours)  
The Entrepreneurial Marketing portion examines the marketing strategies and methods used by successful startups and early stage companies that make best use of their limited resources. It also introduces students to marketing/sales tools, methods, and metrics that are useful in an entrepreneurial setting (e.g., "growth marketing" techniques), including online advertising as well as several unconventional methods. Lastly, it offers practical lessons for planning, designing, and maximizing sales through crowdfunding, Shopify website, and Amazon, among others. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310.
ENTR 3360  Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the challenges and opportunities for managers, employees, and organizations in creating and maintaining a culture and organizational design that foster intrapreneurial endeavors. It also reviews the role of corporate entrepreneurship in building and sustaining innovation within organizations. The course also examines the critical role of corporate culture in driving corporate entrepreneurship, and the nature of individual thinking style and leadership style in organizations demonstrating effective corporate entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310.
ENTR 3370  Entrepreneurial Acquisitions  (4 semester hours)  
Entrepreneurial Acquisitions introduces an alternative path into business ownership. Students gain a deep understanding and appreciation for small business ownership and the transition of ownership. Assignments require students to find real business professionals in the community and recruit them to participate in their final exam simulation project where they present and negotiate an acquisition offer after creating Deal Search Memo, LOI, Due Diligence Checklist, Valuations, Deal Structure, and Purchase Agreements. The course includes visits to small businesses, case studies, and guest speakers. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310. Junior or senior standing required.
ENTR 3385  Entrepreneurial Leadership  (4 semester hours)  
Entrepreneurial leadership involves vision, perspective, opportunity-alertness, empathy, innovativeness, and logical thinking, etc. The course starts with the fundamentals of professionalism including mannerism, communication, and self-discipline, and proceeds to cover the above-mentioned essential attributes and skills required to be a successful entrepreneurial leader. Also discussed in length are the impacts of current affairs (domestic and international) and macroeconomics on businesses as well as the real estate market. Guest speakers are brought in to provide alternative viewpoints and share their experiences. Permission of instructor. Junior or Senior Standing required
ENTR 3398  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
ENTR 4310  Entrepreneurial Finance  (4 semester hours)  
In this course, students are introduced to the financial aspects of small businesses and entrepreneurial ventures. The key topics include evaluating new business ideas and ventures, reading and understanding financial statements of rapidly growing companies, and developing financing strategies. We also discuss various debt and equity alternatives of financing, the different valuation techniques, and key tactics and approaches to negotiating term sheets. (See FNCE 4410.) Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310; BCOR 3410 or FNCE 3400.
ENTR 4325  Real Estate Development  (4 semester hours)  
This course is designed to introduce students to the intricacies of real estate development with the focus on multifamily and mixed-use properties. As the developer, there are multiple facets of the process that require skill and determination. Subjects covered are land acquisition and locational attributes; zoning and entitlements; project design and feasibility; construction costs; financial analysis; obtaining financing and partners; managing construction and the general contractor; lease-up, operations and property management; and finally, sale and/or resolution and repayment to lenders and partners. The course will introduce all these elements and teach students through real development transactions being built in the marketplace. Prerequisites: ENTR 1310 and ENTR 2310 ; BCOR 3410 or FNCE 3400 .
ENTR 4340  International Entrepreneurship  (4 semester hours)  
This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills in three key components of international entrepreneurship: initiating entrepreneurial ventures, managing international business transactions, and dealing with multicultural business environments. The course includes a feasibility study of an international small business venture start up, case study, and experiential learning. (See INBA 4840.) Prerequisites: BCOR 3860, ENTR 1310, and ENTR 2310.
ENTR 4360  International Entrepreneurship  (3 semester hours)  
Focuses on developing knowledge and skills in three key components of international entrepreneurship: initiating entrepreneurial ventures, managing international business transactions, and dealing with multicultural business environments. This course includes a feasibility study of an international small business venture start up, case study , and experiential learning. (See INBA 4860 and MGMT 4660.) Prerequisites: INBA 3810 and MGMT 3610)
ENTR 4370  Product and Business Design  (4 semester hours)  
This course, a joint venture between LMU and OTIS College of Design (or an equivalent institution/department), provides an overview of the key concepts, frameworks, and issues in product design and development. Students are expected to learn to work effectively in an interdisciplinary team to construct a business concept, design a new product, and complete a prototype. Prerequisites: ENTR 3350 and ENTR 3360 or ENTR 4340.
ENTR 4380  Business Incubation  (4 semester hours)  
In this course, students will develop first-hand experience in starting, planning, running, and growing one or more new (or relatively new) venture(s). Each startup will set clear goals and milestones in the beginning weeks of the semester and will work diligently to achieve them by its end. While student learning is the primary goal of the course, students are also expected to move their startups forward and get a taste of success. Upon completion of the course, students will have turned an idea into an exciting and feasible business concept. This course is required for Entrepreneurship majors pursuing the Startup Entrepreneurship pathway. Prerequisites: ENTR 3350 and ENTR 3360 or ENTR 4340.
ENTR 4381  Managing New Ventures  (4 semester hours)  
This course is designed to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge about new and young businesses. Print and live cases will be used to facilitate in-depth exploration of the typical start-up, operating, and growth challenges facing entrepreneurial companies. Guest speakers (founders of or investors in new ventures) will share their entrepreneurial journeys. Students will participate in a team project where they meet with the founder(s) of a local entrepreneurial venture, identity key challenges facing that venture, and develop an in-depth plan to address those challenges. This course fulfills the capstone course requirements for Entrepreneurship majors pursuing the Startup Entrepreneurship pathway and Corporate Entrepreneurship pathway. Prerequisites: ENTR 3350; ENTR 3360 or ENTR 4340.
ENTR 4382  Leading and Managing Change  (4 semester hours)  
This course is designed to provide first-hand experience to the issues and processes of leading and managing change inside of an organization. It introduces students to the real-world issues facing organizations, the resources and barriers to innovation, as well as the strategies and processes for realizing the needed change. The course draws on a broad selection of readings, cases, guest speakers, and a consulting project to examine how organizational issues are identified, analyzed, and resolved in the process of implementing change. A highlight of the course is the formation of student teams for the undertaking of real projects for local companies (for-profit or non-profit organizations). The teams consult with the "client" organizations, develop project proposals, and get hands-on experience through the consulting process. This course is required for Entrepreneurship majors pursuing the Corporate Entrepreneurship pathway. Prerequisites: ENTR 3350 and ENTR 3360 or ENTR 4340.
ENTR 4383  Social Entrepreneurship  (4 semester hours)  
In this course, students are introduced to the field of social entrepreneurship--the process of using entrepreneurial mindset and business skills to create innovative approaches to societal problems. The course explores various concepts and examples of social entrepreneurship (not-for-profit and for-profit) through theory and case studies. Moreover, students will utilize their creativity to explore their own solutions to one or more social problems. A highlight of the course in the formation of student teams for the undertaking of real projects for local companies (for-profit or non-profit organizations). The teams consult with the "client" organizations, develop project proposals, and get hands-on experience through the consulting process. This course is required for Entrepreneurship majors pursing the Social Entrepreneurship pathway. Prerequisites: ENTR 3350 and ENTR 3360 or ENTR 4340.
ENTR 4385  Entrepreneurial Leadership  (4 semester hours)  
Entrepreneurial leadership involves vision, perspective, opportunity-alertness, empathy, innovativeness, and logical thinking, etc. The course starts with the fundamentals of professionalism including mannerism, communication, and self-discipline, and proceeds to cover the above-mentioned essential attributes and skills required to be a successful entrepreneurial leader. Also discussed in length are the impacts of current affairs (domestic and international) and macroeconomics on businesses as well as the real estate market. Guest speakers are brought in to provide alternative viewpoints and share their experiences. Junior or senior standing required. Permission of instructor required.
ENTR 4398  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
ENTR 4399  Independent Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
Requires approval of the Associate Dean.