History (HIST)

HIST 1010  Premodern World History  (4 semester hours)  
A course in global history from roughly 3500/3000 BCE to the "age of exploration" in the fifteenth century, focusing on dynamics of cultural contact in the ancient and medieval periods. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1050  Modern World History  (4 semester hours)  
A course in global history from the "age of exploration" in the fifteenth century to the present, with a variety of encounters and exchanges, which transformed the cultures and societies of all those involved. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1060  Modern Global Environmental History  (4 semester hours)  
A course in global history with a particular focus on environmental history, exploring how humans, animals, natural forces, and science and technology have shaped the environment; the ways in which historical developments such as migration, empire, trade, industrialization, and urbanization have affected humans' relationships with nature; and how the environment has affected historical developments. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Environment, Science, and Technology. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1110  Ancient Mediterranean History  (4 semester hours)  
Examines the origins of Mediterranean societies and cultures, exploring shared contacts and links, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of Antiquity, 1000 BC-AD 600. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1120  Heirs of Rome: Europe, Byzantium, and Islam in the Early Middle Ages  (4 semester hours)  
Considers the emergence of three distinct civilizations - the West, Byzantium, and Islam - out of the Roman Empire; their expansion, divergence, and mutual interactions in the Early Middle Ages; and their clash in the Crusades of the twelfth and thirteenth century. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1130  Crisis and Expansion: Europe and the World, 1200-1648  (4 semester hours)  
This lower division Core course will survey the major developments in European history over four pivotal centuries. From the Black Death and other crises that wracked Europe during the later Middle Ages, this course will move into the early modern period, examining movements of religious reform, religious wars, and European overseas expansion. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1200  European Empires, Exploration, and Exchange since 1500  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the ways in which Europeans interacted with the rest of the world, in terms of exploration, trade, exchange, and imperialism. Students will study the development of overseas empires from the early Portuguese and Spanish exploration of Africa, and Americas, and the Indian Ocean to the late-19th-century "Scramble for Africa" and the establishment of global dominance in the years before the world wars of the 20th century. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1201  Power, Privilege, and Agency in Modern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments in Europe from 1500 to the present, by looking at the related dynamics of power, privilege, agency, and experience. Students will use selected case studies about power, privilege, and agency as a means to interrogate how various categories of difference came to define power relations in both local and global encounters. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1202  The Individual, the State, and Civil Society in Modern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the present in terms of the changing ways in which European cultures have defined a good society and imagined the possibilities for individual action in the world. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1203  Religion, Society, and the Search for Meaning in Modern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the history of Europe in a global context and in terms of the impact of the changing religious belief, practice, and institutional structures in the period from 1500 to the present. Students will consider religion as a social practice and historical artifact. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1204  Revolutions in the Making of Modern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
This course uses the notion of "revolution" as a prism through which to examine the political, economic, social, and cultural transformations in "the West" since 1500. Special emphasis will be on the question of change and continuity, as a means to examine "turning points" in European history. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1250  Black Europe  (4 semester hours)  
Black Europe focuses on the historical experiences of Africans and people of African descent in Europe from antiquity to the present. The courses used the analytical categories of race and Blackness to rethink European history, as well as to consider Europe in a broader global context. HIST Concentrations: Race, Gender, and Culture; Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Public and Applied History University Core fulfilled: Explorations Historical Analysis and Perspectives
HIST 1300  Becoming America  (4 semester hours)  
This course is an introductory survey of American history from the pre-Columbian period to the eve of the Civil War. It focuses on the interaction of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans from first contact to circa 1850, focusing on the experiences of individuals and groups and examines their relationships to the broader structures of American society. HIST Concentrations: Law, Politics, and Society; Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1301  American and the Atlantic World 1450-1850  (4 semester hours)  
The trans-Atlantic world of Europe, Africa, and the Americas as a single unit of study in the wake of the voyages of Columbus, including the North American colonies and early United States, the slave trade and plantation complex, the Columbian exchange, revolutions, and abolition. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1400  The United States and the World  (4 semester hours)  
This course serves as an introductory survey of United States history from the nineteenth century to the present. It focuses on the experiences of groups and individuals and their relationships to the broader structures of United States society by examining changes to American society over time, exploring their causes, and analyzing their consequences within a transnational context. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1401  The United States and the Pacific World  (4 semester hours)  
This class surveys the ways in which U.S. interchanges with Asia and the Pacific Islands have transformed cultural, political, ideological, and socioeconomic developments on both sides of the Pacific from the earliest contact to the twenty-first century within global and comparative frameworks. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1500  State, Society, and the Citizen in the Modern Middle East  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the history of the Middle East from 1453 to the present through an examination of the evolving relationship between the state and the subject/citizen and the question of identity. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Law, Politics, and Society. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspective.
HIST 1501  Islamic Societies: Religion and Empire  (4 semester hours)  
This course is a survey of the pre-modern Middle East and the Islamic world from the rise of Islam through the early modern empires (500-1500 CE) by examining the transformation of Islam from a small religious community to an expansive civilization and society. The course hones in on themes of religion, empire, identity, science and technology, culture, and gender. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture; Law, Politics, and Society. University Core Fulfilled: EXP: Historical Analysis and Perspectives
HIST 1510  Minorities and Women in the Modern Middle East  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the history of the Middle East from 1453 to the present through an examination of the twin impact of Islam and the West on the lives of minorities (ethnic and religious) as well as the status of women. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1520  The Social Lives of Commodities in the Modern Middle East  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the history of the Middle East from 1453 to the present by focusing on a number of commodities (such as tulips, silk, and oil) to chart regional and global socio-economic and cultural connections as well as change over time. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1600  African States and Societies since 1800  (4 semester hours)  
This course addresses the political, social, and cultural history of Africa since 1800. Among the questions it explores are changing systems of governance, shifting borders and identities, and dynamics of colonialism, the diversity of African societies and cultures, and their resilience in the face of historical changes. HIST Concentration: Global Economics, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1700  Colonial Latin America  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to indigenous, African, and Iberian backgrounds. Examines colonial societies through social, economic, and political institutions with attention to the contributions of Indians, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America's diverse societies. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1750  Modern Latin America  (4 semester hours)  
Surveys the nations of Latin America from their independence until the present. Emphasizes the process of nation-building, governance, socioeconomic integration, and coping with modernization. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1800  Modern Asia: China, Korea, and Japan since 1600  (4 semester hours)  
This course introduces the history of East Asia from 1600 to the present. It explores the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of China, Japan, and Korea and focuses on empire-building, economic expansion, nationalism, socialism, decolonization, and popular culture. History Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1850  East Asia: Origins to 1600  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the origins and development of East Asian states and cultures from the earliest times to the early modern era. Topics include the emergence and development of such essential heritages of East Asia as Confucianism, Sinicized Buddhism, bureaucratic institutions, legal culture, social order, diplomatic relations, and trading networks.
HIST 1900  Science, Nature, and Society  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the history of European and North American societies and cultures through the lens of science and nature from the sixteenth century to the present. It traces the history of ideas about science and nature in relation to broader social, economic, and political developments, demonstrating the inseparability of science and social context. HIST Concentration: Environment, Science, and Technology. University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.
HIST 1910  Difficult Histories  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines "difficult histories" such as settler colonialism, slavery, empire, war, and genocide. We will analyze both historical developments themselves and how societies have grappled with the difficult aspects of their own pasts, including how they represent and debate those histories and how understandings of the past shape the present. Fulfills History Concentrations: Public and Applied History; Race, gender, and Culture; Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange
HIST 1995  Introduction to History  (1 semester hour)  
An introduction to the History major, to Loyola Marymount University, and to the various curricular and co-curricular opportunities available to students. Credit/No Credit grading.
HIST 1998  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 1999  Independent Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 2000  What Is History?  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2050  Seminar in World History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in world history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2200  Seminar in European History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in European history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2300  Red, White, and Black: Race in Colonial America  (4 semester hours)  
A social and cultural history of North America from the pre-Columbian period to the American Revolution with a focus on the roots of American race relations. The course will address the impact of competing cultures as they developed and collided during 200 years of conflict. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.
HIST 2400  Picturing Race and Gender  (4 semester hours)  
Using interdisciplinary approaches and cross-cultural perspectives, this class delves into the ways in which visual imageries have been used to create and shape notions of race and gender, both reflecting and influencing socioeconomic relations, cultural expectations, and political norms in the United States. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.
HIST 2405  Civil Rights Activism, 1880-Present  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the history of U.S. civil rights activism and advocacy from the late-nineteenth century to the present, tracing the efforts by several groups to achieve and expand the full rights of United States citizenship, including African Americans, Native Americans, immigrants, LGBT, and women. It also draws connections between activism movements in the United States and throughout the world. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.
HIST 2410  Race and Ethnicity in America  (4 semester hours)  
This course surveys the history of race and ethnicity in the lands that became the United States from the fifteenth century to the present, focusing on three, overlapping themes: (1) the efforts by European nations and the United States to colonize the lands of North America, in part through the subjugation of particular groups such as American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America; (2) the ways that these groups have negotiated such oppression and claimed places within U.S. culture and society; and (3) the intersection of race and ethnicity with other categories of difference, such as gender, class, religion, and sexuality. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.
HIST 2420  American Indian History  (4 semester hours)  
This course surveys American Indian history from the fifteenth century to the present, beginning with the arrival of Europeans on North American shores and ending with the various and complex issues facing Native peoples in contemporary U.S. society. It focuses on three themes: (1) the efforts by European nations and the United States to colonize the lands of North America and establish dominion over its Native populations; (2) the struggles by Indian peoples to negotiate the tremendous changes ushered in by European and American presence in North America; and (3) the ways that Native peoples have claimed places within U.S. culture and society, at the same time that they have redefined their identities as indigenous peoples in both national and international contexts. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.
HIST 2450  Seminar in American History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in American history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2500  Seminar in Middle Eastern History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in Middle Eastern history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2600  Seminar in African History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in African history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2700  Seminar in Latin American History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in Latin American history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2800  Seminar in Asian History  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to history as an intellectual discipline, focusing on the study and writing of history, including historiography and historical methods. Organized around the study of a particular historical issue or episode in Asian history, this is an intensive course on how historians approach problems. History majors and minors only.
HIST 2900  Internship  (1-4 semester hours)  
A course for those students who wish to earn academic credit for an unpaid internship.
HIST 2910  Telling History in Public  (4 semester hours)  
An introduction to the study of history, including historical method, the writing of history, and historical interpretation, with a particular focus on public history--that is, those aspects of historical work that engage the public with the past, including both the study of public narratives about the past and the practice of public history. History majors and minors only. HIST Concentration: Public and Applied History. University Core fulfilled: Flags: Engaged Learning
HIST 2995  History Learning Community  (1 semester hour)  
A learning community course organized around the thematic focus of one of the History program concentrations. Credit/No Credit grading.
HIST 2998  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 2999  Independent Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 3050  The First World War  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the history of the Great War in the Middle, Western Europe, the United States, Russia, and Australia/New Zealand, with a focus on the impact of the war of society, art, and culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3124  Pagans and Saints: Christian Missionaries to 1650  (4 semester hours)  
Studies the interactions between Christian missionaries and non-Christian peoples from the Roman period to the seventeenth century. Topics include the spread of Christianity to Ireland, Germanic Europe, and the Mongols, as well as missionary encounters with China, Japan, and the New World. A principal focus will be on the methods used by preachers to spread their message and the ways native cultures helped shape Christianity. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Faith and Reason.
HIST 3200  European Reformations  (4 semester hours)  
This course traces the religious transformation that took place in the early modern Christian world from the Great Western Schism in the fourteenth century to the Peace of Westphalia that ended the Thirty Years War. The focus will be on (1) the Protestant reformations, (2) the Catholic reform, and (3) the process of European confessionalization leading to the wars of religion in the seventeenth century. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Faith and Reason.
HIST 3210  Other Europes  (4 semester hours)  
Other Europes focuses on the experiences of often marginalized groups in European history, including people of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern descent, religious minorities such as Jews and Muslims, women, queer Europeans, the disabled, and more. What “other Europes” are out there that need examining (e.g., a Black Europe, a Jewish Europe, a queer Europe)? HIST Concentrations: Race, Gender, and Culture; Public and Applied History University Core fulfilled: Interdisciplinary Connections.
HIST 3252  Crime Stories: Morality, Deviance, and Popular Culture in Modern Britain  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the history of the 1860s, the 1930s, and the 1960s through British detective fiction. Considering how and why such radical transformation took place, students examine how fictional narratives relate to contemporary ideas about morality and deviance, helping to undermine, reimagine, or reinforce existing power structures. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3272  Culture and Politics of Weimar Germany  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the history of interwar Germany and the paradoxes of Weimar "modernity" from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating an analysis of cultural developments with an analysis of political and social developments. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3275  The Balkans: History, Culture, Politics  (4 semester hours)  
This course will focus on the history of political, religious, and social movements in the Western Balkans, with an emphasis on understanding how these movements led to conflicts of world significance. Taught on Croatia Study Abroad Program.
HIST 3282  History of Russian Foreign Policy  (4 semester hours)  
With borders stretching from Europe to Asia, Russia has long had global foreign policy interests. Starting with the Napoleonic Wars, pausing at the Cuban Missile Crisis, and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, this course explores a global power's influence and ambition on the global stage. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3430  Religion and U.S. Political History  (4 semester hours)  
This course surveys the history of the intersection of religion (including religious social and political life) and politics in modern America, from the post-Civil War period until the present day. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Faith and Reason.
HIST 3452  US Environmental History  (4 semester hours)  
This course presents essential concepts, concerns, and methods of environmental history - the study of the relationships between humans and their physical environments - in the context of United States history. Topics include American Indians and the environment, European colonization and settlement, urbanization and industrialization, conservation and environmentalism, environmental racism and social justice, and contemporary environmental issues in historical perspective. HIST Concentration: Environment, Science, and Technology. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections.
HIST 3600  Conflict and Genocide in Africa  (4 semester hours)  
This course will cover the causes, dynamics, and consequences of conflict in Africa. It will examine some of the conflicts that have become genocidal, debate the characteristics of war that make one conflict a genocide and another a just war. The course delves into conflict analysis and resolution debates; the international humanitarian, legal, and diplomatic responses, including a reflection on the emergence of the term "genocide"; the global politics and commerce that fanned conflicts in Africa; the search for peace and stability in post-cold war Africa; and the place of Africa in the global "war on terrorism." HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 3702  Women in Colonial Latin America  (4 semester hours)  
A historical exploration of the place of women and men within the social systems of pre-Columbian and colonial Latin America. The course explores the gendered dimensions of the economy, politics, and culture in indigenous, Spanish, and contemporary societies. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3704  Latin American Revolutions in Film  (4 semester hours)  
Film and the history of two of Latin America's most infamous revolutionary movements: The Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the Cuban Revolution of 1959. This course examines these movements in the context of 19th- through 20th-century Latin America, specifically in conversation with the region's struggles with independence, political stability, economic development, migrations, and urbanization. The course also examines the legacies of revolution in the contemporary Latin American landscape, specifically analyzing ongoing struggles with economic development, democratic stability, migrations, uprisings, and drug wars. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections.
HIST 3706  Justice in Latin America  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines concepts of justice in Latin America and applies them to social, political, and economic problems in Latin America, from 1492 to the present, to debate solutions. An engaged learning experience will allow students to add another layer of critical analysis to their historical research as they assess the Latin American experience. HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 3708  Race in Colonial Latin America  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the complicated history of race in Latin America, including how Latin Americans used race to organize society and how this social construct shaped the experiences of men and women of different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Topics include: race mixture, racial classification, and cultural hybridity; slavery and emancipation; immigration; nationalism and citizenship; and the intersections of race, gender, and class.
HIST 3810  The Chinese Economy  (4 semester hours)  
This course explores the characteristics and development of the modern Chinese economy, including economic developments in the PRC as well as the long-term historical processes that continue to influence the path of China's development. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 3820  Environment and Economy in China  (4 semester hours)  
This course investigates the interactions between human activities and their environment in Chinese history. Topics include visions of the relationship between nature and humanity in Chinese philosophy, climate change, demographic trends, food security, interventions of the imperial state, and ecological transformations on China's frontiers. HIST Concentration: Environment, Science, and Technology. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3910  Museums and Society  (4 semester hours)  
This course introduces students to the issues and practice of museum studies and the history of museums. The course considers the history and theory of museums in different national, regional, and transnational contexts, considering in particular the development of art, history, and ethnographic museums. HIST Concentration: Public and Applied History. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 3998  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 3999  Independent Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 4010  Pirates and Piracy  (4 semester hours)  
The history of maritime piracy from its ancient maritime roots to present. The course will include coverage of ocean basin histories, maritime labor, society and culture, especially in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, with a special focus on the "Golden Age" in the Atlantic/Caribbean during the 17th and 18th centuries. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4020  Mediterranean Cities  (4 semester hours)  
This course approaches the history of the medieval and early modern Mediterranean Sea (ca. 700-1700) through an examination of its cities and, to a lesser extent, its islands. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4050  Global History of Food  (4 semester hours)  
Using interdisciplinary methodologies, this course explores the ways in which food has the power to both define and reflect cultural, socioeconomic, religious, and political realities within a transnational context. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4101  Ancient Greece  (4 semester hours)  
Explores the origins of the Greeks from Homeric times to the death of Philip of Macedon. Topics include the developments of political forms, including democracy, and most notably, drama and philosophy against the background of war and conflict.
HIST 4102  Alexander and the Hellenistic World  (4 semester hours)  
Examines the career and impact of Alexander the Great, particularly as seen in the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean world and to the East as far as India. Topics include the Hellenization on non-Greeks, Jews, and Romans in particular, and the further development of philosophy and learning.
HIST 4105  Ancient Rome  (4 semester hours)  
Studies the origins of the city of Rome with the Etruscans and its transformation into that of Romans, and how the Romans expanded through Italy and conquered the Mediterranean world, ca. 800 BC-AD 44. Topics include the issue of Romanization, political development, the idea of empire, and the assimilation of Greek culture.
HIST 4106  Imperial Rome  (4 semester hours)  
Explores the world of Imperial Rome from Britain to Mesopotamia, from the reign of Augustus to the end of classical antiquity, ca. 27 BC-AD 600. Topics include Romanization and the imperial system, the origins, survival, and victory of Christianity, and Rome's struggles with Persians and Germans.
HIST 4122  The Rise of Medieval Europe  (4 semester hours)  
Traces the emergence of a coherent European civilization from the collapse of Roman power in the fifth century to the rise of new forms of Latin Christian unity in the eighth through eleventh centuries.
HIST 4126  Medieval Spain: Land of Three Faiths  (4 semester hours)  
This upper division course will cover eight centuries of Spanish history, from the founding of Muslim al-Andalus (711 CE) to the Christian conquest of Granada (1492 CE). A dominant theme of this course will be the shifting dynamics of power and interconfessional relations of Spain's Jewish, Muslim, and Christian inhabitants. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4132  The Viking World  (4 semester hours)  
Explores Viking society from the late eighth to the early eleventh century, including the reasons for the Scandinavian invasions of early-medieval Europe, the course and consequences of Viking activity in the British Isles and France, the wider settlement of the Norse from Russia to Greenland and North America, and the Christianization of the Viking world. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4142  The Transformation of Medieval Europe  (4 semester hours)  
Examines the fragmentation of the medieval forms of European unity from the twelfth through sixteenth centuries. Topics include political and social change, questions of authority, and religious strife.
HIST 4150  Law and Society in Medieval Europe  (4 semester hours)  
This course traces the history of law from the Roman Empire through “legal revolution” of the twelfth and thirteenth century. Topics include the relationship between legislation and judicial practice, the intersecting concepts of crime and sin, the development of legal processes such as inquisition, and the emergence of law as a profession. HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4200  Early Modern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the political, intellectual, social, economic, and cultural developments in Europe from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.
HIST 4205  Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments in Europe during the "long nineteenth century," from the French Revolution to the Great War. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4206  20th-Century Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments in Europe from the Great War through the end of the twentieth century.
HIST 4215  European Imperialism  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the "new imperialism" in Africa and Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including the origins and dynamics of European imperialism, the structures of colonial rule, the effects on the colonized and their responses, and decolonization. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4225  Gender and Sexuality in European History  (4 semester hours)  
A study of European history using gender and sexuality as the primary categories of analysis. The course examines how gender and sexuality have shaped questions of identity and power relations in modern European societies, including the roles that men and women play in society; notions about femininity, masculinity, and queerness; and changing norms regarding sexuality. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4230  The City in European History  (4 semester hours)  
From the Renaissance city-state to burgeoning industrial cities of the nineteenth century to socialist urban agglomerations of the twentieth century, this course explores the political, economic, and social fabric of European cities. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4250  Modern Britain and the British Empire  (4 semester hours)  
A study of how Britain helped build the Atlantic slave-based economic system, used these resources to become the world's first industrial nation, expanded its global empire, became a democracy, and has struggled with its identity since its colonies became independent and it joined (and then left) the European Union. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4255  Modern Ireland  (4 semester hours)  
Covers key events of Ireland's struggle for independence, incorporating debates about the uses of history and memory, the formation of national identity, and the politics of nostalgia.
HIST 4260  The French Revolution  (4 semester hours)  
An inquiry into the causes of the fall of the French monarchy, the creation of a civic order, a new political culture, and the impact of war and terror on French society.
HIST 4271  Modern Germany  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the history of Germany from the establishment of the German nation-state to the present, including the two world wars, the Weimar Republic, Nazism and the Holocaust, the two Germanies of the Cold War period, and German unification.
HIST 4272  20th-Century Eastern Europe  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural developments in the states between Germany and Russia from the collapse of the Habsburg, German, and Ottoman Empires after World War I to the Balkan Wars at the end of the twentieth century.
HIST 4273  Nazi Germany  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the history of Nazi Germany, including the National Socialism as an ideology, the Nazi seizure of power, the power structures of the Third Reich, German society and culture under Nazism, and the Holocaust. HIST Concentrations: Public and Applied History; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4280  The Rise of Russia, 900-1825  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the origins of the Russian Empire from the arrival of the Vikings to the emergence of Russia as a Great Power. Topics include autocracy, serfdom, religious revolts, imperial expansion, and competitive emulation of the West.
HIST 4281  Modern Russia, 1825-1991  (4 semester hours)  
Traces the revolutionary challenges to the Romanov dynasty, attempts to modernize the multinational empire, the revolution and civil war, and the interplay between communism and nationalism in the history of the Soviet Union. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4282  Ethnicity and Empire in Russia  (4 semester hours)  
During the Cold War, scholars overlooked the ethnic diversity of the Soviet Union and focused simply on the Russians. This course takes the experience of multiple ethnic groups - Ukrainians, Jews, Tatars - into consideration and examines the history of Russia as the history of a multi-ethnic state.
HIST 4300  Colonial America  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the origin and growth of the English colonies from 1607 with a focus on the development of colonial economic, social, and intellectual life. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4301  Revolutionary America  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the origins, course, and results of the American Revolution.
HIST 4302  Jacksonian America  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century, focusing on the social, cultural, economic, and political developments of the era. HIST Concentrations: Law, Politics, and Society; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4303  The Civil War  (4 semester hours)  
A history of the Civil War era that covers the causes, fighting, and consequences of the war. HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4304  Nineteenth-Century America  (4 semester hours)  
A social and cultural history of nineteenth-century America. Covers such topics as industrialization, urbanization, religion, literature, westward migration, immigration, class formation, gender, and race.
HIST 4305  Victorian America  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of American culture and society in the second half of the nineteenth century, focusing on such diverse topics as family, sexuality, popular culture, urbanization, immigration, class conflict, race relations, and America's place in the world. HIST Concentrations: Law, Politics, and Society; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4400  Rise of Modern America  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of American culture and society in the early twentieth century, focusing on such topics as race, class, gender, consumerism, reform movements, and America's place in the world.
HIST 4401  Recent America  (4 semester hours)  
The course examines U.S. history from the New Deal to the present and focuses on the dialectical relationship between the United States and the world. Themes include U.S. involvement in international economic, military, and ideological conflicts; the study of various modern racial, gender, and economic social movements; national political debates; and post-WWII consumer and popular cultures. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4402  Politics and Culture of the Cold War, 1917-1989  (4 semester hours)  
Beginning with the Russian Revolution of 1917 and ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, this class examines the ways in which rivalries among nations and anticommunist efforts around the world impacted the development of American societies and cultures. HIST Concentration: Global Economies, Encounters, and Exchange.
HIST 4403  Consensus and Conflict: America in the 1950s and 1960s  (4 semester hours)  
This class focuses on two pivotal decades in twentieth-century American history by addressing topics such as changing gender and racial identities, the Counterculture, the Civil Rights Movement, and international politics. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4410  History of Los Angeles  (4 semester hours)  
The history of Greater Los Angeles from the eighteenth century to the present, focusing on migration, economic development, race and ethnic relations, and the city's relationship to the rest of the world. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4411  The American West  (4 semester hours)  
The history of the American West from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on settlement, Native American experience, economic development, environment, and the West in popular culture. HIST Concentrations: Environment, Science, and Technology; Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 4412  History of California  (4 semester hours)  
The history of California from the eighteenth century to the present, focusing on migration, economic development, race and ethnic relations, and the relationship of the state to the rest of the world. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4423  Asians in America: From the "Yellow Peril" to the "Model Minority"  (4 semester hours)  
This class traces the many-faceted histories of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders from cross-cultural and transnational perspectives, beginning with the earliest immigraton to the present era. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounters and Exchange; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4425  Chicana/o History  (4 semester hours)  
(See CHST 3360.) HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4427  Immigrant America  (4 semester hours)  
The history of immigration to the United States from the colonial period to the present, focusing on immigrant experiences, transnational ties, immigration law, and citizenship, as well as the ways that race, class, gender, religion, and sexuality shaped Immigrant America. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4430  Women in American History  (4 semester hours)  
An exploration of women's experience in American history from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on such variables as class, race/ethnicity, and region, as well as the impact of changing gender roles on American society, culture, and politics. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4431  History of Childhood and the Family  (4 semester hours)  
A history of childhood and the family from the colonial era to the present. Examines the diverse experiences of children and families in North America, with special attention to gender, race, class, and regional issues. Also explores how notions of childhood and the family changed over time. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4432  American Reform Movements  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the major reform impulses in American society, including such movements as abolitionism, Women's Rights, Progressivism, and Civil Rights. HIST Concentrations: Law, Politics, and Society; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4433  Health and Disease in American Culture  (4 semester hours)  
The history of health, disease, and medicine in the American social and cultural context, from the colonial period to the present. HIST Concentrations: Environment, Science, and Technology; Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4440  Imagining Asian Pacific America  (4 semester hours)  
Using interdisciplinary approaches and cross-cultural perspectives, this class explores the ways in which certain Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have been portrayed and, in turn, have portrayed themselves in the visual culture throughout historical time and space. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4441  Hollywood and History  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the motion picture industry and the relationship of films to United States society from the early twentieth century to the present. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections.
HIST 4442  Westerns and History  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the motion picture industry and the relationship of films to United States society from the early twentieth century to the present, focusing on films set in the American West. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture
HIST 4450  Urban America  (4 semester hours)  
This course charts the history of the modern American city (in global context), from the post-Civil War period until the present day, with special emphasis on major metropolitan regions such as New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4453  The Invention of Communities  (4 semester hours)  
This class examines a multitude of socioeconomic, political, ideological, and cultural conditions that have caused the formation as well as the disintegration of communal bonds in 19th- and 20th-century United States. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture. University Core fulfilled: Interdisciplinary Connections
HIST 4510  Star, Cross, and Crescent  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the status of Jews and Christians in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the present, focusing on the local as well as international factors that affected their status over time. The course also considers the history of other marginalized groups such as slave-soldiers, gypsies, and eunuchs.
HIST 4520  The Ottoman Empire  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the history of the Ottoman Empire from the 13th century to the end of WWI. It focuses on Ottoman political, legal, and social institutions and practices as they evolved over time. HIST Concentrations: Global Economies, Encounter, and Exchange; Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4540  The Palestine/Israel Conflict  (4 semester hours)  
This course examines the history of the Palestine/Israel conflict from its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4600  African Kingdoms  (4 semester hours)  
A study of significant kingdoms of Black Africa exploring the major themes of the period.
HIST 4610  A Quest for the Nile's Source  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the quest for the source of the Nile River and the interaction of African, European, and Asian peoples in the area.
HIST 4620  South Africa  (4 semester hours)  
The history of South Africa during the last two centuries with emphasis on political rivalries, apartheid, and economic development.
HIST 4630  History of Environment and Technology in Africa  (4 semester hours)  
The history of the environment and technology in Africa from 1500 to the present, focusing on the African continent as incubator of technological and environmental innovation, the diversity of African cultures, and connections between Africa and other world regions.
HIST 4640  Colonial Africa, 1860-1980  (4 semester hours)  
A study of the inception and development of European rule over various parts of Africa by European imperialists of the 19th and 20th centuries, leading to an examination of the processes by which African countries gained their independence in the second half of the 20th century.
HIST 4650  The Cold War in Africa  (4 semester hours)  
The history of the Cold War from the perspective of African nations and peoples, emphasizing decolonization, national liberation movements, foreign intervention, and the relationship between African and world politics.
HIST 4700  Early Mexico  (4 semester hours)  
The major social, political, and economic trends and events in Mexico from the Independence movement to the present. The course examines mass movements; leadership; popular culture; globalization; violence, gender, and drugs; and the political and cultural impact of changing domestic and international policies. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4705  The Inquisition: The Holy Office in Europe, Asia, and America  (4 semester hours)  
An examination of the actual historical institutions behind the modern myths of the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions, from their establishment in the late fifteenth/early sixteenth centuries to their abolition in the early nineteenth century. Topics include the 16th-century proto-inquisitorial efforts to prosecute indigenous idolatry and sorcery by episcopal tribunals; the prosecution of Jews, Protestants, and "illuminated" men and women in the 17th and 18th centuries; and the history of the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal's American and Asian colonies. HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.
HIST 4820  Modern China  (4 semester hours)  
This is a course on modern Chinese history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Major themes examined are the collapse of the traditional Chinese world order, the failure of the republican revolution of 1911, the birth of Chinese nationalism, Mao Zedong's Chinese communism, and Deng Xiaoping's strategy for modernization.
HIST 4830  Women in East Asian History  (4 semester hours)  
An exploration of the ways in which specific institutional arrangements, political settlements, and economic changes informed the organization of family and lineages, inheritance practices, work, and thus shaped the lives of women. HIST Concentration: Race, Gender, and Culture.
HIST 4900  Internship  (1-4 semester hours)  
A course for those students who wish to earn academic credit for an unpaid internship.
HIST 4910  Topics in Public History  (4 semester hours)  
This course introduces students to the issues and practice of public history, which is dedicated to addressing and engaging the broader public in issues of history, memory, commemoration, and identity. Public history refers to all of those aspects of historical work that engage the public with the past, offering interpretation, inviting active consideration, and communicating the importance of history to current ideas, practices, identities, and debates. Such public venues include museums, historical sites, archives, government agencies, popular media, and now the broad spectrum of historical exhibition online. This course may be repeated for degree credit up to two times as long as topic is different. HIST Concentration: Public and Applied History.
HIST 4998  Special Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 4999  Independent Studies  (1-4 semester hours)  
HIST 5000  Seminar in World History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in world history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5100  Seminar in Ancient History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in ancient history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5110  Seminar in Medieval History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in medieval European history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5115  Seminar in Early-Modern European History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in early-modern European history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5200  Seminar in Modern European History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in modern European history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5400  Seminar in American History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in American history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5500  Seminar in Middle Eastern History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in Middle Eastern history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5600  Seminar in African History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in African history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5700  Seminar in Latin American History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in Latin American history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5800  Seminar in Asian History  (4 semester hours)  
A seminar on a topic in Asian history, in which students will explore the historical literature around a given topic and then produce a work of original research. Juniors and seniors only. History majors and minors only.
HIST 5900  Senior Thesis  (4 semester hours)  
A course for students who wish to pursue an intensive research project under faculty direction, culminating in a thesis based on primary source research.
HIST 5995  Capstone ePortfolio  (1 semester hour)  
Students complete an ePortfolio to synthesize and integrate their learning experiences in the History major. Credit/No Credit grading.